December 2013

Tips on Belching, Bloating & Flatulence

Many people overindulge during the holiday season.  The amount and variety of foods consumed can often lead to abdonimal bloating and gas.  Here are some suggestions to alievate these symptoms as published by The American College of Gastroenterology and reprinted below.

Belching is caused by swollowing air from eating or drinking too fast; not chewing food completely; drinking carbonated beverages; chewing gum or sucking on hard candies; excessive swollowing due to nervous tension or post-nasal drip; and lastly forced belching to relieve abdominal distress.

Abdominal bloating and discomfort may be due to intestinal sensitivity or symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.  Foods to avoid include broccoli, baked beans, cabbage, carbonated drinks, cauiliflower, gum, and hard candy.

Abdominal distention results from weak abdominal muscles.  To prevent abdominal distensiontighten abdominal muscles by pulling in your stomach several times during the day.  Do sit ups exercises if possible.  Wear an abdominal support garment if exercise is too difficult.

Flatulence is gas created through bacterial action in the bowel.  Foods that are likely to form gas include: milk & dairy products; certain vegetables such as baked beans, cauiliflower, broccoli and cabbage; and certian starches such as wheat, oats, corn and potatoes. Rice is an excellent substitute.

If your symptoms persist post- holiday season, please contact your physician. 

 

 

Spyglass Direct Visualization System

DDAR Physicians are using cutting edge new technology at Good Samaritan Hospital to aide in the diagnosis and treatment of gallstones, liver disease and certain types of cancer.  This exciting new technology from Boston Scientific is the Spyglass Direct Visualization System or Spyglass for short. The Spyglass technology provides our physicians with a powerful tool to get enhanced visibility of the pancreas, liver and gallbladder so that they can make a more accurate diagnosis of the patient’s condition.  It is particularly useful in identifying gallstones, hepatic strictures and lesions that may be cancerous.   Spyglass is used while the patient undergoes an ERCP, Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatograpy Procedure.

Dr. Vipul Shah noted that the Spyglass uses a tiny fiber optic wire and camera to locate the gallstone.  This is particularly useful in cases where there are multiple stones hidden in the bile duct.  The technology can be combined with a probe that emits pulse waves to break the stones  into smaller pieces, that can be more readily removed and without subjecting the patient to major surgery. 

Dr. Yaron Langman further commented that in the past the only option for detecting cancer was a blind swipe with a brush which resembles a pipe cleaner.  The test was only effective 65 percent of the time, which often delayed patient treatment.  Now, with the Spyglass system, the gastroenterologist can see the lesion and using the SkyBite Biopsy forceps take a biopsy thus increasing the likelihood of obtaining an accurate diagnosis with the goal of expediting the patient’s treatment when required. 

Spyglass technology is just one of the exciting new treatment modalities which utilize nanotechnology and enhanced optics to diagnose and treat many GI ailments and complaints.  Please stay tuned to future blogs wherein we will showcase other cutting edge technology in development.   

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