DDAR Blog

Dr. Richard Moccia Addresses GERD Prevention

Dr. Richard Moccia was interview by The Rockland Times on GERD Awareness and Prevention.   The 12th annual Gastro Intestinal Reflux Disease (GERD) Awareness Week was held from November 23rd to November 29th. It is sponsored by the Intestinal Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD) to focus attention on GERD diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Moccia commented that often diet and lifestyle modifications are all that is required to reduce or eliminate GERD Symptoms.

To read the entire article, please clinck on the following link.  http://www.rocklandtimes.com/2014/11/26/take-some-good-advice-dont-let-acid-reflux-ruin-your-thanksgiving-meal/

Cancer Survivors Lobby for the Elimination of Colorectal Screening Cost Barriers

Hundreds of cancer patients, survivors and volunteers from the Mid-Atlantic States traveled to Washington, D.C. on Tuesday September 16, 2014 for an annual trip seeking support for continued cancer research, prevention and palliative care funding.Additionally, the group was lobbying for the elimination of colorectal cancer screening cost barriers.

Currently, Medicare patients who seek colonoscopies as preventative measures can see their out-of-pocket costs soar if polyps are found. Because of that potential cost, many people are skipping their scheduled screening procedures despite the fact that studies confirm that more than half of all colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented each year if everyone over the age of 50 is regularly screened. Representative from the American Cancer Society noted that our Congressional representatives need to know that we need to make cancer a national priority.  Every day, across the United States, 1,600 Americans die from cancer.

Please Pass the Broccoli

Do you remember when your parents had to bribe you with some treat, like cake or ice cream to get you to eat your broccoli!  Well! Mom did have your best interest at heart.  As it turns out, broccoli and other cruciferous veggies such as kale, cabbage and cauliflower are loaded with healthful nutrients.

According to NIH funded research being performed by Elizabeth Sattely, whether or not, our bodies can take advantage of the health benefits of the cruciferous vegetables may depend on the bacteria living in our guts.  Dr. Sattely’s research focuses on identifying those species of microbes or bacteria responsible for transforming plant nutrients, like broccoli into beneficial health promoting molecules. Dr. Sattely looks at special molecules found in plants, including a sulfur-containing metabolites, known as glucisinolates, which give broccoli and cauliflower is unique taste and aroma; and they role in inhibiting disease. Dr. Sattely hypothesis is that during digestion, glucosinolates are broken down by bacteria into compounds that provide a variety of beneficial benefit to the body, such as reducing inflammation, inhibit a variety of cancers in animal research models.

Dr. Sattely believes that the community of microbes or bacteria varies among different people, and she hypothesizes that some people’s intestines may not contain enough of certain types of good bacteria to produce optimal levels of plant/ vegetable derived nutrients. 

Here is the link to the entire NIH Article Blog:    http://directorsblog.nih.gov/2014/05/22/creative-minds-broccoli-microbes... 

Exercise & "Good Bacteria" in Your Gut

The New York Times in a Wellness Blog, authored by Gretchen Reynolds show the results of research performed Dr. Fergus Shanahan, Professor of Gastroenterology and the Director of the Alimentary Pharmabiotics Center at University College Cork, part of the National University of Ireland. 

Dr. Shahahan studied professional rugby players, normal-weight men who engage in little exercise, and sedentary men who are overweight or obese and found that the pro athletes harbored the greatest diversity of good bacteria  in their GI tracts and higher levels of Akkermansiaceae, a beneficial bug associated with lowered risk of obesity and inflammation.. Although Dr. Shanahan’s results are still preliminary, he noted that it seems likely that any amount of exercise should make your gut more welcoming to “good bacteria". 

To read the entire NY Times Blog, please click on the following link  The New York Times (tiered subscription model)/Well blog

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